Privacy and Cyber Security

Privacy and Cyber Security

Privacy and Cyber Security

With the enormous amount of sensitive information stored digitally, companies need to take the proper measures to ensure this data is never compromised. Ultimately, it is the responsibility of business owners to protect their clients’ data with privacy and cyber security.

Failing to do so can result in a data breach, which costs companies billions of dollars every year. Understanding the risks involved with data security can help you prevent a privacy breach.

Know the Privacy and Cyber Security Risks

The first step in protecting your business is to recognize basic types of risk:

  • Hackers, attackers and intruders—These terms are applied to people who seek to exploit weaknesses in software and computer systems for their personal gain. Although their intentions are sometimes benign, their actions are typically in violation of the intended use of the systems that they are exploiting. The results of this cyber risk can range from minimal mischief (creating a virus with no negative impact) to malicious activity (stealing or altering a client’s information).
  • Malicious code—This is the term used to describe any code in any part of a software system or script that is intended to cause undesired effects, security breaches or damage to a system.
    • Viruses: This type of code requires that you actually do something before it infects your system, such as open an email attachment or go to a particular Web page.
    • Worms: This code propagates systems without user interventions. They typically start by exploiting a software flaw. Then, once the victim’s computer is infected, the worm will attempt to find and infect other computers.
    • Trojan horses: Trojans hide in otherwise harmless programs on a computer, and much like the Greek story, release themselves when you’re not expecting it and cause a lot of damage. For example, a program that claims to speed up your computer system but actually sends confidential information to a remote intruder is a popular type of Trojan.

IT Risk Management Practices

To reduce your cyber risks, it is wise to develop an IT Risk Management Plan at your organization. Risk management solutions utilize industry standards and best practices to assess hazards from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification or destruction of your organization’s information systems.

Consider the following when implementing risk management strategies at your organization:

  • Create a formal, documented risk management plan that addresses the scope, roles, responsibilities, compliance criteria and methodology for performing cyber risk assessments. This plan should include a characterization of all systems used at the organization based on their function, the data stored and processed and importance to the organization.
  • Review the cyber risk plan on an annual basis and update it whenever there are significant changes to your information systems, the facilities where systems are stored or other conditions that may affect the impact of risk to the organization.

Due Diligence When Selecting an ISP

In addition, your organization should take precautionary measures when selecting an internet service provider (ISP) for use for company business.

An ISP provides its customers with Internet access and other Web services. In addition, the company usually maintains Web servers, and most ISPs offer Web hosting capabilities. With this luxury, many companies perform backups of emails and files, and may implement firewalls to block some incoming traffic.

To select an ISP that will reduce your cyber risks, consider the following:

  • Security – Is the ISP concerned with security? Does it use encryption and SSL to protect any information that you submit?
  • Privacy – Does the ISP have a published privacy policy? Are you comfortable with who has access to your information, and how it is handled and used?
  • Services – Does your ISP offer the services that you want and do they meet your organization’s needs? Is there adequate support for the services provided?
  • Cost – Are the ISP’s costs affordable and are they reasonable for the number of services that you receive? Are you sacrificing quality and security to get a lower price?
  • Reliability – Are the services provided by the ISP reliable, or are they frequently unavailable due to maintenance, security problems and a high volume of users? If the ISP knows that their services will be unavailable, does it adequately communicate that information to its customers?
  • User supports – Are there any published methods for contacting customer service, and do you receive prompt and friendly service? Do their hours of availability accommodate your company’s needs?
  • Speed – How fast is your ISP’s connection, and is it sufficient for accessing your email or navigating the Web?
  • Recommendations – What have you heard from industry peers about the ISP? Were they trusted sources? Does the ISP serve your geographic area?

Government Regulation

There aren’t many federal regulations regarding cyber security, but the few that exist cover specific industries. The 1996 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the 1999 Gramm-Leach-Bliley (GLB) Act and the 2002 Homeland Security Act, which includes the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) mandate that health care organizations, financial institutions and federal agencies, respectively, protect their computer systems and information. Language is often vague in these laws, which is why individual states have attempted to create more specific laws on cyber security.

California led the way in 2003 by mandating that any company that suffers a data breach must notify its customers of the details of the breach. Currently, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have data breach notification laws in place.

Protection is our Business

Your clients expect you to take proper care of their sensitive information. You can never see a data breach coming, but you can always plan for a potential breach. Contact GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. today—we have the tools necessary to ensure you have the proper coverage to protect your company against a data breach.

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

As one of the fastest-growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more. The GDI team has developed an “insurance cost reduction” quoting plan, that provides you with the best coverage at the best rate!

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business.

Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive cyber liability insurance quote!

Cyber Threats on Remote Employees

Cyber Threats on Remote Employees

Cyber Threats on Remote Employees

The COVID-19 pandemic has solidified remote work as a new operational standard. Employers should expect this trend to only grow in the future. In fact, many major companies, such as Twitter and Microsoft, have indicated that remote work will be an indefinite option for their employees. While this is exciting in many ways, remote work also comes with unique challenges—namely, cybersecurity. This article discusses some cybersecurity risks that remote employees face and how to prevent cyber threats on remote employees.

Cyber Threats on Remote Employees

Cyber Threats to Monitor

Hackers have been assaulting businesses since the first computer was invented, always trying new methods of gaining critical information. Depending on the size of the organization, it may receive dozens or thousands of hacking attempts each day. These attempts are typically brushed aside by IT security teams and firewalls. However, with employees working from home, those protections aren’t as guaranteed.

The following are some of the most common cyber threats facing individuals:

  • Phishing and vishing: Phishing is an attempt to gain personal information, such as computer passwords, Social Security numbers or other data. Hackers and scammers will impersonate a legitimate company and send fake emails to solicit this information, typically with a phony threat.
  • Vishing, or voice phishing, takes this process a step further. This is when a scammer spoofs a legitimate phone number (from within the organization or otherwise) and poses as an IT help desk, using that alias to solicit personal information. These calls may even be routed to personal cellphones, making it harder for organizations to catch. Vishing attempts are a recent trend, but are increasingly prevalent. Employers should review existing cybersecurity policies to directly address vishing.
  • Malware: Malware is a type of computer virus that is typically disguised as an innocuous program, email attachment or link. These viruses infect computers and can do any number of tasks, typically hidden to the user. For instance, they might store password data, track website activity or download personal files.
  • Brute force attacks: Brute force attacks are when hackers try logging into someone’s account many, many times. These attempts work most often when individuals reuse usernames and passwords across different accounts. A hacker may expose the information to one account, then use those credentials everywhere else they can think of, eventually gaining access.

These cyber threats are made worse when employees are working from home, especially if they conduct business on personal devices or don’t connect to a secure network. That’s why it’s important for employers to proactively address cyber threats with their remote employees.

Need Help With Your Cyber Security? Download our free guide today!

Protecting Remote Employees from Cyber Threats

There is no single solution to avoiding cyber threats on remote employees. But there are key steps organizations can take to protect their employees and critical data. Below are some of them.

  • Behavioral analytics tracking software: This is software that monitors each individual’s computer habits. Since hackers can impersonate an employee, it’s hard to detect when someone’s credentials have been compromised. With analytics tracking software, the program would be able to spot when a user is displaying abnormal computer usage. This will depend on the individual, but it may include accessing certain files or transferring large chunks of data.
  • Automated threat detection software: This software is like antivirus programs found on many computers by default. It can scan files and detect malicious programs automatically. Automated threat detection software often pairs with other efforts, such as behavioral analytics.
  • Comprehensive work-from-home guidelines: Using personal devices to conduct business is an easy way to compromise usernames and passwords. Employers should set clear guidelines regarding acceptable technology to use (often a work-provided laptop) and work locations. For instance, cafes may be off-limits because they often have unsecured networks.
  • Employee education: Education and training are perhaps the best protections against cyber threats. Employees should know basic cybersecurity tactics, such as how to spot a phishing email, how to recognize a scam caller and how to report a potential security breach. They should also be instructed to not reuse login credentials, especially between work accounts and personal accounts.

Employee education is especially important, as hackers and scammers become more sophisticated each week. Employers should keep an eye out for new scams and alert employees as needed.

As with any successful initiative, cybersecurity protocols must be observed by all stakeholders within an organization. That means educating everyone, from the top down, about how to protect themselves and their workplace from cyber threats. If even a few individuals go without proper training, the entire organization could be compromised.

As the business world becomes more connected, cyber threats will get more sophisticated and commonplace. Start educating employees about cybersecurity today to better protect your organization. Speak with GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. for more cyber tips and other workplace guidance.

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

As one of the fastest growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more. The GDI team has developed an “insurance cost reduction” quoting plan, that provides you with the best coverage at the best rate!

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business.

Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive cyber liability insurance quote!

Cyber Security Best Practices

Cyber Security Best Practices

Cyber Security Best Practices

As workplace technology continues to evolve and telecommuting becomes a common practice, it’s crucial for employees like you to play your part in keeping our organization cyber-secure. After all, a cyber incident could lead to serious ramifications for our business—allowing hackers or cybercriminals to access employees’ personal information and other classified company data. Our Cyber Security Best Practices will help keep your business safe online.

By prioritizing proper cybersecurity measures, you can help protect our workplace from cyber incidents and ensure your own information stays safe as well.

Cyber Security Best Practices

Implement These Cyber Security Best Practices:

  • Pay attention—First and foremost, be sure to actively participate in all workplace cybersecurity training sessions and familiarize yourself with our applicable policies and procedures. This includes (but is not limited to) setting smart passwords, detecting common signs of phishing attacks and knowing how to safely store workplace devices.
  • Keep your home cyber-secure—While working remotely, it’s important to implement cybersecurity measures comparable to that of the workplace. This includes connecting to a secure Wi-Fi network, conducting regular software updates, enabling firewalls and installing antivirus protection.
  • Browse with caution—When browsing online, be mindful of cyber threats and scams. Never click on suspicious pop-ups, ads or links, and only use verified, well-known websites. If the website address is labeled as “not secure” or uses an unrecognizable domain, close your browser immediately.
  • Stay organized—A cluttered workspace and poorly organized digital files can make it difficult to keep track of important information and increase your vulnerability to cyber incidents. Try to clear your workstation of excess papers or garbage, and store important documents in secure locations. Further, save any critical digital files in their appropriate folders or online databases—don’t leave your desktop in disarray.
  • Know how to respond—Despite your best efforts, a cyber incident may still take place. That’s why it’s vital to be prepared and know how to respond in the event of an incident. Make sure you review our organization’s cyber incident response plan regularly and ask questions if you don’t understand something.

An Examination of Our Cyber Breach

Our office suffered a 3rd party cyber breach on July 10, 2019.  We’ve put together a case study that explains what we experienced, the costs we incurred, what we learned, and what we would change .

Download your copy today!

If you have any further questions regarding workplace cybersecurity, talk to your supervisor and reach out to the IT department, if needed.

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

GDI Insurance Agency, Inc.

As one of the fastest growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more. The GDI team has developed an “insurance cost reduction” quoting plan, that provides you with the best coverage at the best rate!

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business.

Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive cyber liability insurance quote!

3 Common Phishing Attacks and How to Avoid Them

3 Common Phishing Attacks and How to Avoid Them

3 Common Phishing Attacks and How to Avoid Them

A significant number of organizational data breaches stem from phishing attacks. At a glance, these attacks result from a cyber criminal utilizing a fraudulent email or other form of communication to trick the victim into providing sensitive information or downloading malicious software on their device. Phishing attacks have become increasingly sophisticated in recent years and can take place in a variety of different formats. Read more to see how to avoid the 3 common phishing attacks.

What’s more, the consequences of such an attack on organizations like yours can be severe—including lost or stolen data, prolonged business interruptions, financial devastation and reputational ruin. With this in mind, it’s crucial for your organization to understand the most common types of phishing attacks and implement strategies to reduce your risks.

Download Our 3rd Party Cyber Breach Case Study

3 Common Phishing Attacks

How to Avoid the 3 Common Phishing Attacks

Review the following for an overview of three top forms of phishing attacks and steps that your organization can take to protect against them:

  1. Deceptive phishing—Known as the most common type of phishing attack, deceptive phishing occurs when a cyber criminal impersonates a trusted organization (e.g., a bank) via email to fool the victim into providing sensitive data or login credentials. To prevent deceptive phishing attacks, instruct staff to avoid responding to emails from seemingly legitimate organizations if the message appears overly urgent or aggressive, contains a generic greeting or has spelling errors.
  2. Spear-phishing—This type of phishing attack entails a cyber criminal sending a more customized email (e.g., using the victim’s name or job title in the greeting) to convince the victim to click on a malicious link or attachment. To avoid spear-phishing attacks, discourage staff from sharing personal or company information online, and consider investing in security software that analyzes incoming emails for harmful links or attachments.
  3. Whaling—This form of phishing attack takes place when a cyber criminal specifically targets a company executive with a spear-phishing email, gaining access to the executive’s account or device and authorizing fraudulent financial transfers or the distribution of employees’ personal information. Reduce the risk of whaling attacks within your organization by requiring executives to complete the same cyber security training as the rest of your staff and implementing multifactor authentication for all financial transactions and data transfers. 
3 Common Phishing Attacks

What Does Cyber Insurance Cover?

Across industry lines, organizations have become increasingly reliant on workplace technology to conduct key business operations. Whether it be for communication purposes, e-commerce, or data collection and storage, continued technological advancements have helped streamline a variety of organizational processes.

Nevertheless, utilizing such technology and digital practices within your workplace carries additional cyber exposures and liabilities. All it takes is a single security failing to cause large-scale damages, leaving your organization to deal with the costly ramifications that accompany a data breach. That’s why it’s crucial to secure adequate cyber insurance.

Specifically, having a cyber liability insurance policy in place can help protect your organization against financial losses that result from a data breach or other cyber incident. Cyber liability insurance typically includes the following types of coverage:

  • First-party coverage—This form of coverage can offer protection for any losses that your organization directly incurs from a cyber incident, including:
  • The cost of replacing or restoring any lost, stolen or damaged electronic data
  • Income losses and extra expenses that result from disrupted business operations
  • Ransom payments from a cyber extortion incident
  • The cost of notifying any parties affected by a cyber incident
  • Reputation preservation expenses (e.g., any public relations efforts following a cyber incident)
  • Third-party coverage—This form of coverage can provide protection for claims made or legal action taken against your organization by any stakeholders that suffered losses due to your company’s security failings, including:
  • Claims regarding negligent acts, errors or omissions that caused a cyber incident
  • Legal investigation and defense costs that result from a cyber incident
  • Regulatory fines or penalties due to noncompliance with data protection laws

Don’t let your organization suffer the costly consequences of a data breach. Contact us today to secure a cyber liability insurance policy that meets your organization’s unique needs.

Top Reasons to Secure Cyber Liability Insurance

Many organizations incorrectly label cyber insurance as a luxury purchase rather than a necessity. In fact, a recent survey conducted by insurance experts found that nearly 60% of small and midsized companies don’t have any type of cyber insurance. What’s worse, less than 30% of those companies feel inclined to purchase a such a policy in the near future.

Despite these startling statistics, it’s vital for organizations of all sizes and sectors to secure adequate cyber insurance. Here’s why:

  • You can’t afford a lack of protection. A single cyber incident can cost your organization millions of dollars in recovery expenses, business interruption costs and legal fees, which—without an insurance policy in place—could cause financial devastation.
  • Cyber attacks are common. Don’t assume that cyber incidents are a rare occurrence. Especially as cyber criminals become increasingly sophisticated and organizations continue to digitize key business operations, data breaches have become a top threat—making cyber insurance all the more critical.
  • Coverage is a contractual requirement. Many clients, vendors and suppliers include cyber insurance as a requirement in contractual agreements. In other words, securing cyber insurance is crucial to maintain your supply chain and ensure solid customer relationships.
  • Noncompliance can be costly. In the event that you violate state, federal or international data protection laws, the resulting fines can be significant. Cyber insurance can assist you with these costs.
GDI Insurance Agency, Inc.

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

As one of the fastest growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more. The GDI team has developed an “insurance cost reduction” quoting plan, that provides you with the best coverage at the best rate!

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business.

Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive cyber liability insurance quote!

Cyber Criminals Seeking to Capitalize on Coronavirus

Cyber Criminals Seeking to Capitalize on Coronavirus

Cyber Criminals Seeking to Capitalize on Coronavirus

Criminals prey on unfortunate circumstances, seeking to capitalize on victims during times of panic and hardship. Unfortunately, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is no exception.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, told individuals to be vigilant about scams related to COVID-19.

Cyber criminals have been known to pose as charities or legitimate websites to lure victims into sending money or revealing personal information. Individuals should scrutinize any email, text or social media post related to COVID-19 and be cautious when clicking any links or attachments.

CISA offered specific guidelines for individuals to avoid being scammed online:

  • Avoid clicking links from unsolicited emails, and be wary of email attachments.
  • Use trusted sources when looking for factual information on COVID-19, such as CDC.gov.
  • Never give out personal or financial information via email, even if the sender seems legitimate.
  • Never respond to emails soliciting personal or financial information.
  • Verify a charity’s authenticity before making any donations.

It’s not always easy to disregard messages from senders that seem reputable, like banks. If individuals have any doubts about an email from a seemingly legitimate source, they should navigate to the organization’s website and use the contact information there to reach out. Individuals should never respond to the initial message.

What Can Employers Do?

Employers should consider notifying employees about the existence of these COVID-19 cyber scams. Especially during times of crisis, scammers will pose as reputable sources and use fear to solicit personal information. Employers should also communicate best practices so employees know how to respond to such solicitations.

It may also benefit employers to back up data and bolster network protections in case an employee clicks the wrong link and compromises the entire system.

You can download our Cyber Security Guide here

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

As one of the fastest growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more.

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business. Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive insurance quote!

Doxxing and Your Cyber Risks

Doxxing and Your Cyber Risks

Doxxing and Your Cyber Risks

In this day and age, the amount of information being stored online is constantly increasing. Some of this information may be confidential, and some may be so sensitive that a data breach could threaten the future of your business. What is Doxxing?

“Doxxing” is a type of cyber attack that results in the collection and exposure of sensitive information that could damage the credibility or reputation of a person or an organization. In doxxing, the criminal’s goal is to breach, collect and expose documents, often abbreviated as “docs.” This is usually done with the purpose of either harassing, blackmailing or embarrassing the victim. Sometimes, doxxing may even be part of the hacker trying to get revenge or incite physical harm.

As cyber criminals become more sophisticated, it is clear that anyone can be targeted, whether they be ordinary citizens, law enforcement agents, politicians or business leaders.

Doxxing

Your Business at Risk

Companies of all sizes are at risk of being the target of cyber attacks. Good cyber security practices are always important for protecting your employees’ information, confidential company files and sensitive details about your partners or clients.

But, when it comes to doxxing, it’s your leaders who are most likely to be targeted by attacks. One of the most effective ways to embarrass a business, or harm its reputation, is by exposing negative information about one of its leaders. If embarrassing details about a leader in your organization come to light, even if they have nothing to do with the actual business practices of your company, the effects can be devastating.

How Doxxing Works

There are a number of ways that doxxers may be able to gain access to sensitive information. Some common sources include:

  • IP addresses—All devices connected to the internet have an IP address, which can then be tracked with an IP logger to track online activities and locations.
  • Data brokers—Data brokers purchase customer lists from other businesses that you may have provided your information to, such as airlines or subscription services.
  • Domain sales brokers—Registration information used to create a website can be accessed through domain sales brokers or the WHOIS database. This is especially noteworthy for organizations that have created their own website.

In a doxxing attack, the attacker may use any one of a number of possible methods. These can vary greatly and include using the aforementioned IP logger, breaching the security of a Wi-Fi network, stalking social media profiles or even using cellphone numbers to learn personal information.

Cyber Security Practices

When it comes to protecting your company’s data and reputation, things naturally start with implementing, explaining and enforcing good cyber security practices.

To keep your business as safe as possible from a possible doxxing attack, implement the following policies:

  • Require strong passwords with a variety of letters, numbers and special characters.
  • Use a variety of passwords across different platforms.
  • Instruct employees to avoid connecting devices to untrusted or unprotected Wi-Fi networks.
  • Keep software on devices updated, and avoid installing any unapproved software.
  • When possible, use VPNs in order to conceal IP addresses.
  • Instruct employees to avoid suspicious websites, be wary of phishing emails and avoid using their work email for personal reasons, such as subscription services.

These policies should be followed by all employees, including leadership, whether they are working at the office, remotely, with company computers or personal devices.

Doxxing and social media

Social Media Awareness

In addition to hackers continuing to improve their methods of attack, many of their targets have simultaneously been making things even easier for cyber criminals. With social media being a part of everyday life, it has also led to vulnerability for people who are too willing to share personal information online. Oftentimes, these people do not realize that such information can be used against them.

It is important that you advise leaders in your company to increase their privacy settings on social media, or to limit the amount of information that they share to begin with. Instruct your employees to avoid allowing just anyone to view their social media pages and to limit “friends” to people who they actually know in real life and are confident would not attempt to do them harm. When it comes to doxxing, allowing just anyone to see your address, phone number, email or even place of employment can help hackers wedge their way into the private details of your life.

Employees should think twice about how much information they share, even with people they think they can trust. It may be a good idea to have employees look themselves up on a search engine, as they may be surprised by how much information is actually out there and completely public.

The process of looking oneself up on the internet and then having potentially sensitive or vulnerable information deleted is often referred to as “self-doxxing” and can greatly decrease the risk of an attack.

High Stakes

There is no shortage of examples of organizations suffering huge financial losses and severely damaged reputations due to a leader bringing about embarrassment.

Even if the victim of the attack has done nothing wrong that directly associates with their job or your company, disreputable information about their personal life can still cost you dearly.

GDI Insurance Agency, Inc.

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

As one of the fastest growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more.

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business. Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive cyber liability insurance quote!