Maintenance Tips for Winter

Maintenance Tips for Winter

Home Maintenance Tips for Winter

Get a head start on winterizing your home, so you can comfortably enjoy the approaching colder month. These maintenance tips for winter will get you on your way!

Winter Maintenance Tips

Winter weather can be unpredictable, and cold temperatures, high winds, ice and snow can cause serious damage to your home. To avoid costly weather-related repairs, it’s important to prep your home and property for winter. Consider the following maintenance tips to keep your home cozy and safe inside:

  • Weatherproof windows and doors—Check your doors and windows for gaps, and seal them up with caulk, weatherstripping or thermal window treatments.
  • Clean the dryer hose—According to the National Fire Protection Association, U.S. firefighters respond to more than 14,000 house fires caused by dryers each year. Remember to clean the lint filter, empty or replace the hose, and regularly check the vent for blockage.
  • Inspect the fireplace—Clogged chimneys can also lead to house fires and can cause carbon monoxide poisoning. It’s important to schedule an annual fireplace inspection and professional chimney sweep.
  • Check the HVAC system—Before the weather cools down, change the filters and schedule your annual HVAC system inspection and tune-up.
  • Prevent freezing pipes—To help keep pipes at a constant temperature, ensure there is sufficient insulation and that heat can circulate in your home.

Download our Winter Tips Checklist Today!

Equally as important, consider the following preventative measures outside the house:

  • Trim tree branches—Keep tree limbs at least 3 feet away from the house to prevent excess water from seeping into potential cracks on the roof or siding.
  • Seal cracks—Take a walk around your home to look for any exterior cracks in caulk, paint, wood or concrete surfaces. It’s critical to protect the exterior from the elements and prevent water leaks and drafts into your home.
  • Clean out the gutters—Clogged gutters or downspouts can damage the foundation or cause ice dams—which may require expensive repairs. Remove leaves, twigs and other debris from gutters to ensure they aren’t holding water.

Maintenance Tips for Winter Driving

Even if you live in an area where the winters are mild, you still need to perform a car care check as the days grow shorter. Consider the following tips to prep your car for winter roads and unpredictable weather:

  • Inspect your tires for tread wear and have tires rotated during every oil change. Consider switching to snow tires if you live in an area that gets heavy snow to gain better traction on slippery roads.
  • Regular vehicle maintenance can help prevent car troubles. Consider changing your oil and antifreeze, replacing wiper blades and inspecting headlights and brake lights.
  • Inspect your battery—Battery capacity decreases in cold weather, so get your battery tested before the chill sets in. Consider parking your vehicle in a garage to further protect the battery from the cold elements.
  • Fill up your tires—Monitor your tire pressure and, as needed, fill up tires with air. It’s best to keep up with the monitoring process once a month.
  • Check the heater—If you don’t have a working heater in your car already, be sure to fix it. In the event that you have car troubles and are unexpectedly stuck in your car for an extended period of time, you’ll want that heat until help is on the way.

Besides prepping and keeping your vehicle running well, stash an emergency kit in your car to help in the case of a winter car emergency.

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

As one of the fastest growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more. The GDI team has developed an “insurance cost reduction” quoting plan, that provides you with the best coverage at the best rate!

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business.

Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive personal insurance quote!

Cyber Threats on Remote Employees

Cyber Threats on Remote Employees

Cyber Threats on Remote Employees

The COVID-19 pandemic has solidified remote work as a new operational standard. Employers should expect this trend to only grow in the future. In fact, many major companies, such as Twitter and Microsoft, have indicated that remote work will be an indefinite option for their employees. While this is exciting in many ways, remote work also comes with unique challenges—namely, cybersecurity. This article discusses some cybersecurity risks that remote employees face and how to prevent cyber threats on remote employees.

Cyber Threats on Remote Employees

Cyber Threats to Monitor

Hackers have been assaulting businesses since the first computer was invented, always trying new methods of gaining critical information. Depending on the size of the organization, it may receive dozens or thousands of hacking attempts each day. These attempts are typically brushed aside by IT security teams and firewalls. However, with employees working from home, those protections aren’t as guaranteed.

The following are some of the most common cyber threats facing individuals:

  • Phishing and vishing: Phishing is an attempt to gain personal information, such as computer passwords, Social Security numbers or other data. Hackers and scammers will impersonate a legitimate company and send fake emails to solicit this information, typically with a phony threat.
  • Vishing, or voice phishing, takes this process a step further. This is when a scammer spoofs a legitimate phone number (from within the organization or otherwise) and poses as an IT help desk, using that alias to solicit personal information. These calls may even be routed to personal cellphones, making it harder for organizations to catch. Vishing attempts are a recent trend, but are increasingly prevalent. Employers should review existing cybersecurity policies to directly address vishing.
  • Malware: Malware is a type of computer virus that is typically disguised as an innocuous program, email attachment or link. These viruses infect computers and can do any number of tasks, typically hidden to the user. For instance, they might store password data, track website activity or download personal files.
  • Brute force attacks: Brute force attacks are when hackers try logging into someone’s account many, many times. These attempts work most often when individuals reuse usernames and passwords across different accounts. A hacker may expose the information to one account, then use those credentials everywhere else they can think of, eventually gaining access.

These cyber threats are made worse when employees are working from home, especially if they conduct business on personal devices or don’t connect to a secure network. That’s why it’s important for employers to proactively address cyber threats with their remote employees.

Need Help With Your Cyber Security? Download our free guide today!

Protecting Remote Employees from Cyber Threats

There is no single solution to avoiding cyber threats on remote employees. But there are key steps organizations can take to protect their employees and critical data. Below are some of them.

  • Behavioral analytics tracking software: This is software that monitors each individual’s computer habits. Since hackers can impersonate an employee, it’s hard to detect when someone’s credentials have been compromised. With analytics tracking software, the program would be able to spot when a user is displaying abnormal computer usage. This will depend on the individual, but it may include accessing certain files or transferring large chunks of data.
  • Automated threat detection software: This software is like antivirus programs found on many computers by default. It can scan files and detect malicious programs automatically. Automated threat detection software often pairs with other efforts, such as behavioral analytics.
  • Comprehensive work-from-home guidelines: Using personal devices to conduct business is an easy way to compromise usernames and passwords. Employers should set clear guidelines regarding acceptable technology to use (often a work-provided laptop) and work locations. For instance, cafes may be off-limits because they often have unsecured networks.
  • Employee education: Education and training are perhaps the best protections against cyber threats. Employees should know basic cybersecurity tactics, such as how to spot a phishing email, how to recognize a scam caller and how to report a potential security breach. They should also be instructed to not reuse login credentials, especially between work accounts and personal accounts.

Employee education is especially important, as hackers and scammers become more sophisticated each week. Employers should keep an eye out for new scams and alert employees as needed.

As with any successful initiative, cybersecurity protocols must be observed by all stakeholders within an organization. That means educating everyone, from the top down, about how to protect themselves and their workplace from cyber threats. If even a few individuals go without proper training, the entire organization could be compromised.

As the business world becomes more connected, cyber threats will get more sophisticated and commonplace. Start educating employees about cybersecurity today to better protect your organization. Speak with GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. for more cyber tips and other workplace guidance.

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

As one of the fastest growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more. The GDI team has developed an “insurance cost reduction” quoting plan, that provides you with the best coverage at the best rate!

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business.

Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive cyber liability insurance quote!

Preventing and Responding to Landscapers Hypothermia

Preventing and Responding to Landscapers Hypothermia

Preventing and Responding to Landscapers Hypothermia

Working outdoors in the winter can expose you to dangerously low temperatures. This cold weather can heighten your risk of experiencing a variety of complications—such as hypothermia. It’s important to review how Preventing and Responding to Landscapers Hypothermia for your team.

That’s why it’s crucial to utilize proper safety measures while you work in frigid temperatures. Review the following guidance to learn more about what hypothermia is, how to prevent it and what to do in the event that a co-worker develops any symptoms.

What Is Hypothermia?

Hypothermia can occur when your body’s core temperature falls below 95 degrees Fahrenheit. This condition is typically caused by exposure to extreme cold, but can also happen after getting drenched by rain or submerged in frigid water. Common symptoms of hypothermia include:

  • Shivering
  • Drowsiness and exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Shallow breathing
  • Slurred speech
  • Loss of coordination
  • Unconsciousness

If left ignored or improperly treated, hypothermia can be fatal.

Preventing and Responding to Landscapers Hypothermia

Implement the following safety precautions to help prevent hypothermia on the job:

  • Always check the weather before working outdoors to properly prepare yourself. Try to limit your time outside if weather conditions are extremely cold, wet or windy.
  • Wear several breathable, yet protective layers of clothing while you work. This includes an inner layer to keep sweat away from the skin (lightweight wool), a middle layer to warm the body (fleece or microfiber insulation) and an outer layer that will repel wind, snow and rain (polyester or nylon). In addition to these layers, make sure you bundle up with:
  • A hat that covers your head and ears
    • A scarf or neck warmer
    • Mittens (rather than gloves)
    • Thick, wool socks
    • Waterproof boots that will keep your feet properly insulated
  • Be sure to eat healthy foods that are rich in carbohydrates and protein prior to working in the cold to help fuel your body. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water before, during and after your shift.
  • If you start developing any early symptoms of hypothermia (e.g., shivering and drowsiness), tell your supervisor and go indoors to warm up. If your condition doesn’t improve, seek medical attention.

Responding to Hypothermia

In the event that a co-worker starts showing signs of hypothermia, follow these steps:

  • Move the individual out of the cold and inform your supervisor immediately. If the individual is unresponsive or not breathing, call 911. Provide CPR if needed (as long as you are certified to do so).
  • Remove any wet clothing that the individual is wearing. Provide them with warm clothing and blankets for insulation.
  • Keep the individual close to a heat source, such as a space heater or fireplace.
  • Be gentle with the individual—never rub or massage their skin in an attempt to warm them up, as this could trigger cardiac arrest.
  • If the individual is awake and alert, give them a warm (but not hot) beverage. Avoid offering them coffee or alcohol.

Keep in mind that these steps are not a substitute for proper medical care. Unless the individual’s symptoms are extremely mild, it is recommended that they seek medical attention.

Safety First

Your safety is our first priority. Talk to your supervisor if you have any further questions on preventing or responding to hypothermia.

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

As one of the fastest growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more. The GDI team has developed an “insurance cost reduction” quoting plan, that provides you with the best coverage at the best rate!

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business.

Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive Landscapers insurance quote!

California Sexual Harassment Prevention Training FAQ

California Sexual Harassment Prevention Training FAQ

California Sexual Harassment Prevention Training FAQ

SB 1343 requires that all employers of 5 or more employees provide 1 hour of California sexual harassment prevention training and abusive conduct prevention training to non-managerial employees and 2 hours of sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention training to managerial employees once every two years. Existing law requires the training to include harassment based on gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation and to include practical examples of such harassment and to be provided by trainers or educators with knowledge and expertise in those areas. The bill also requires the Department to produce and post both training courses to its website, which employers may utilize instead of hiring a trainer.

An employer is required to train its California-based employees so long as it employs 5 or more employees anywhere, even if they do not work at the same location and even if not all of them work or reside in California.

Under the DFEH’s regulations, the definition of “employee” for training purposes includes full-time, part-time, and temporary employees, unpaid interns, unpaid volunteers, and persons providing services pursuant to a contract (independent contractors) Click the below toolkit for additional tools, including a sample sexual harassment and abusive
conduct prevention training:

NEW UPDATE: By what date must employees be trained?

All employees must now receive training by January 1, 20211. Employers of 50 or more employees have an existing and ongoing obligation to train new supervisory employees within six months of assuming their supervisory position. Beginning January 1, 2021, new supervisory employees in workplaces of 5 or more employees must be trained within six months of assuming their supervisory position, and new nonsupervisory employees must be trained within six months of hire. Employees must be retrained once every two years.

NEW UPDATE: What if the employees are seasonal, temporary or otherwise work for less than six months?

Employers are required to provide training within 30 calendar days after the hire date or within 100 hours worked, whichever occurs first, beginning January 1, 20212. Employers are not required to train employees who are employed for fewer than 30 calendar days and work for fewer than 100 hours.

  • In the case of a temporary employee employed by a temporary services employer, as defined in Section 201.3 of the Labor Code, to perform services for clients, the training shall be provided by the temporary services employer, not the client


NEW UPDATE: When will the Department of Fair Employment and Housing’s online training
courses be available?

SB 1343 requires that DFEH make online training courses available on the prevention of sexual harassment and abusive conduct in the workplace. DFEH expects to have all trainings available by July 30, 2020. In the interim period, DFEH is offering a SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND ABUSIVE CONDUCT PREVENTION TOOLKIT, including a sample sexual harassment and
abusive conduct prevention training. Employers may use the training in conjunction with an eligible trainer to provide sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention training.

  • SB 778 signed by Governor Newsom on 8/30/19 amended existing law to change deadline of harassment training until 1/1/2021.
  • 2SB 530 signed by Governor Newsom on 10/10/19 amended existing law to change deadline to 1/1/2021 for seasonal and
    temporary worker harassment training compliance.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT PREVENTION TRAINING FAQ

Do employers need to train independent contractors, volunteers, and unpaid interns?

No, it is not required that employers train independent contractors, volunteers, and unpaid interns. However, in determining whether an employer meets the threshold of having 5 employees and being subject to the harassment prevention training requirement, independent contractors, volunteers, and unpaid interns must be counted. For example, if an employer has 2 full time employees and 6 unpaid interns, the employer would meet the training threshold requirement and would need to ensure the two full time employees receive training only.

What if a supervisor or non-supervisory employee has received the training in compliance with 12950.1 within the prior two years either from a current, a prior or alternate, or a joint employer? Do they have to retake the training again?


No. Supervisors do not need to retake the training. But their new, alternate or joint employer must give them the employer’s anti-harassment policy, require them to read it, and require them to acknowledge receipt of it. This must happen within six months of the supervisor assuming their new supervisory position (or within six months of the creation of a new business or the expansion of a business that was previously not required to provide training). However, the current employer is responsible for ensuring that all supervisors have fulfilled the training requirement contained in 12950.1, which may require verifying compliance from the prior, alternate, or joint employer.

For non-supervisory employees who received harassment prevention training in compliance with 12950.1 from another employer within the prior two years, they must be required to read and to acknowledge receipt of the current employer’s anti-harassment policy. Again, the current employer will be responsible for ensuring that all non-supervisory staff have fulfilled
the training requirement contained in 12950.1, which may require verifying compliance from the prior, alternate, or joint employer.

Does DFEH have a list of approved outside training providers, or can DFEH recommend or approve an outside training provider for my company to use?

DFEH does not approve training providers. DFEH cannot offer recommendations or approvals for other training providers.

I believe I may be eligible to become a trainer; how can I verify this?

There is currently no certification requirement for qualified trainers, and DFEH is unable to provide guidance as to whether one meets the qualifications of a trainer. If you believe you meet the requirements found in 2 CCR 11024, you may choose to offer your services as a trainer.

Does a trainer who is also an employee need to receive California sexual harassment prevention training in order for their employer to be compliant?

No. An individual who is a qualified training provider according to the regulations (and who does provide the training) does not need to participate in a separate sexual harassment prevention training for their employer to be in compliance with the training requirements.

What documentation is required for those who have completed the training?

The law requires employers to keep documentation of the training it has provided its employees for a minimum of two years, including but not limited to the names of the supervisory employees trained, the date of training, the sign-in sheet, a copy of all certificates of attendance or completion issued, the type of training, a copy of all written or recorded materials that comprise the training, and the name of the training provider. Examples of tracking individual compliance include a certificate and/or a sign-in sheet that includes a verification that trainees completed the training. Documentation of the training should not be sent to DFEH but should be kept on the employer’s premises.

If I have employees located outside of California, are they required to be trained?

No. While employees located inside and outside of California are counted in determining whether employers are covered under the Act, employees located outside of California are not themselves required to be trained.

What is meant by “effective interactive training”?

Effective interactive training can include any of the following:

  • Classroom training that is in-person, trainer-instruction, whose content is created by a trainer
    and provided to a supervisor by a trainer, in a setting removed from the supervisor’s daily
    duties.
  • E-learning that is individualized, interactive, computer-based training created by a trainer and
    an instructional designer that includes a link or directions on how to contact a trainer who
    shall be available to answer questions and to provide guidance within two business days
    after the question is asked.
    • The trainer shall maintain all written questions received, and all written responses or guidance provided, for a period of two years after the date of the response.
  • Webinar training that’s an internet-based seminar whose content is created and taught by a trainer and transmitted over the internet or intranet in realtime.
  • Other “effective interactive training” and education includes the use of audio, video or computer technology in conjunction with classroom, webinar and/or e-learning training.

If an employer utilizes a webinar as their effective interactive California Sexual Harassment Prevention training, can the training be watched in a large group at the same time?

Yes, but it is up to the employer to comply with the documentation procedures, including the following:

• An employer utilizing a webinar for its supervisors or non-supervisory employees must document and demonstrate that each supervisor and non-supervisory employee who was not physically present in the same room as the trainer nonetheless attended the entire training and actively participated with the training’s interactive content, discussion questions, hypothetical scenarios, polls, quizzes or tests, and activities.

• The webinar must provide an opportunity for all employees to ask questions, to have them answered and otherwise to seek guidance and assistance.

• For a period of two years after the date of the webinar, the employer shall maintain a copy of the webinar, all written materials used by the trainer and all written questions submitted during the webinar, and document all written responses or guidance the trainer provided during the webinar.

In addition to the California Sexual Harassment Prevention training (and corresponding process and procedures), is there anything else required?

Yes, every employer must post a poster developed by the Department regarding TRANSGENDER RIGHTS and SEXUAL HARASSMENT in a prominent and accessible location in the workplace.

Does the employer have to pay for sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention training? Does the employer have to provide paid time for such training?

California law specifies that, “An employer…. shall provide” sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention training. Gov. Code 12950.1(a)-(b). The Department is authorized to seek a court order that “the employer” has not complied with this requirement. Gov. Code 12950.1(f). This language makes clear that it is the employer’s – not the employee’s – responsibility to provide the required training, including any costs that may be incurred. This language also makes clear that employees may not be required to take such training during their personal time; the training must be “provided” by the employer as part of an individual’s employment.

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

As one of the fastest growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more. The GDI team has developed an “insurance cost reduction” quoting plan, that provides you with the best coverage at the best rate!

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business.

Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive business insurance quote!

Natural Gas Safety for Fleets

Natural Gas Safety for Fleets

Natural Gas Safety for Fleets

Alternative fuels are being used more today to fuel commercial fleets. Compared to using other types of fuel, using alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquified natural gas (LNG) has great benefits for employers. Some of these benefits include fewer emissions, reduced operating costs and price stability. While working with and handling natural gas is not new, many employees have never had to fuel vehicles with it. Accordingly, there are natural gas safety measures to take note of and train your employees on.

Each fleet determines its needs for what type of alternative fuel should be used. This is largely based on what type of vehicle it will be used for or the distance of the routes. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) provides the standards for fuel storage and delivery systems of CNG and LNG. These standards should be referred to when necessary.

Natural Gas Properties

LNG is a colorless, odorless and environmentally nontoxic gas made primarily of methane and ethane. It is cryogenically cooled by bringing the temperature down to -259 degrees Fahrenheit for ease of storage and transport. Since LNG is liquid, it is stored unpressurized. When LNG is used, it converts back to its gas form. If LNG is leaked, it transitions into a vapor cloud and dissipates because it is lighter than air.

CNG is an odorless compressed methane gas that is stored at very high pressure. There is an odor additive mixed in with the gas called mercaptan that gives it the smell of sulfur or rotten eggs. It is used to alert people that there is a leak. CNG is lighter than air and dissipates quickly, making it more flammable, unlike when it is in its liquified form.

Safety Concerns for Natural Gas

LNG and CNG can be more preferable choices for fuel because there are fewer hazards in the event of a spill. The gas is lighter than the air, so it dissipates quickly and therefore, there is no substantial clean up. Put another way, it does not have the same spill concerns as petroleum products.

LNG and CNG have slightly different safety requirements while working with them. LNG has more requirements for what personal protective equipment (PPE) should be worn and the training that should be completed, while CNG is hazardous due to the pressurized lines.

Personal Protective Equipment

PPE is always necessary to minimize exposure to potential hazards. There are differences in what PPE should be worn when working with LNG or CNG.

Since LNG is stored at such a cold temperature, recommended PPE includes:

CNG requires similar PPE, but since CNG is not cryogenic, the requirements are a bit different. When working with CNG, recommended PPE includes:

All pieces of PPE are meant to keep workers safe while working with CNG or LNG. Remember, though, some pieces are required for different job tasks when working with the gas. Make sure workers fill out a job hazard analysis (JHA) to determine the appropriate PPE for the job task at hand.

Employee Training for Natural Gas

Make sure employees know the gases they are working with and review the safety data sheet (SDS). When using LNG, there should be specialized training for the job tasks that require its use. If employees are fueling vehicles with LNG, have standard operating procedures (SOPs) in place to train them on. Make sure the employees understand the hazards associated with each form of gas and why the PPE is required. 

When working with CNG, it is very important the employees are trained on the hazards of working with pressurized gas lines and what to do in case of an emergency or a leak. Make sure there are SOPs in place for fueling vehicles with CNG.

Emergency Preparedness and Response

If your organization works with either natural gas, an emergency preparedness plan must be developed and utilized. Start with completing a spill risk assessment to determine how a spill may occur. Then develop a spill response plan and procedure to follow when there is a spill. Make sure to identify the proper agencies and authorities that need to be contacted in case of a spill. The best practice would be to have the local authorities (fire department) meet with you to help develop the plan. There should be an alarm system in place to alert the proper personnel when a spill occurs. Once the plan is completed, make sure to train all affected employees on the specifics of the plan.

By understanding the risks of LNG and CNG, risks of workplace hazards can be reduced, and your organization can enjoy the benefits of working with cleaner fuels.

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

As one of the fastest growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more. The GDI team has developed an “insurance cost reduction” quoting plan, that provides you with the best coverage at the best rate!

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business.

Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive insurance quote!

Combating Workplace Safety Complacency

Combating Workplace Safety Complacency

Combating Workplace Safety Complacency

It’s vital for employees to feel comfortable in their job role and capable of performing workplace tasks effectively. However, comfort shouldn’t come at the cost of complacency. Combating workplace safety complacency is a real issue for some businesses.

Being complacent on the job and ignoring safety hazards can carry significant consequences in the workplace—such as near-miss incidents, injuries and even fatalities. After all, just because your workplace is safe, doesn’t mean you don’t have to follow proper precautions. In fact, many safety incidents aren’t caused by unsafe conditions, but rather by careless acts or behaviors.

That’s why it’s crucial for you to play your part in combating complacency, keeping both yourself and others safe at work. Review this guidance to understand what workplace safety complacency is and how to prevent it.

business liability insurance

What Is Workplace Safety Complacency?

Put simply, workplace safety complacency occurs when an employee becomes so experienced or familiar with their job responsibilities that they start to develop an overly relaxed attitude toward tasks. This attitude shift can cause the employee to ignore or become complacent with their job hazards and stop taking proper safety precautions.

Employees can display workplace safety complacency in a variety of ways—including rushing through tasks, skipping important safety steps during a task, multitasking or engaging in distracting activities while performing a task.

Regardless of how confident or comfortable you are with workplace tasks, it’s imperative to avoid complacency. Even the most experienced employees can hurt themselves or others if they fail to uphold adequate safety precautions.

How to Prevent Workplace Safety Complacency

Here’s what you can do to combat safety complacency within the workplace:

  • Take hazards seriously. Remember that no matter your skill level, you’re never immune to workplace hazards. Always pay attention during workplace safety meetings and training sessions to fully understand the risks that accompany your role and comprehend the consequences of engaging in unsafe actions.
  • Follow workplace policies and procedures. Ensure you follow all safety policies and procedures when performing workplace tasks, even if it seems tedious. Don’t rush through tasks, try to multitask or skip certain steps.
  • Conduct safety audits. Consider having a co-worker routinely audit you to see if they identify any safety concerns while you work—this is also known as a behavior-based safety observation (BBSO). Make sure you assist your co-workers by auditing their work through BBSOs as well. By observing others, you may even become more aware of your own habits and identify additional areas for improvement.

To ensure a successful safety culture within our organization, it’s crucial for you to be comfortable addressing complacency issues on the job. If you have any concerns regarding workplace safety complacency, talk to your supervisor.

GDI Insurance Agency, Inc.

California’s Leader in Insurance and Risk Management

As one of the fastest growing agencies in California, GDI Insurance Agency, Inc. is able to provide its clients with the latest and greatest of what the insurance industry has to offer and much, much more. The GDI team has developed an “insurance cost reduction” quoting plan, that provides you with the best coverage at the best rate!

We are headquartered in Turlock, CA, with locations across the heart of California’s Central Valley, Northern California and beyond to provide a local feel to the solutions and services we provide our clients. We pride ourselves on exceeding our client’s expectations in every interaction to make sure that our client’s know how much we value and appreciate their business.

Contact us today 1-209-634-2929 for your comprehensive insurance quote!